Medieval Feminist Forum

Access current and past issues of the Medieval Feminist Forum here: http://ir.uiowa.edu/mff/

Begun in 1986 as Medieval Feminist Newsletter (MFN) and renamed Medieval Feminist Forum in 1999, MFF publishes articles from across the Humanities disciplines that address the study of late Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Early Modern era, ca. 500-1500 C.E., from the perspective of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist studies. It also contains roundtables about the state of gender & feminist scholarship, book reviews, and specialized bibliographies. MFF is published twice yearly and migrated from print to digital format in 2009. MFF is peer-reveiwed and is indexed by MLA Bibliography (2005+), Feminist Periodicals (1996+), and Feminae. The Subsidia series, which consists of occasional special topics volumes, was launched in 1999. To date, there are two volumes in this series.

Contributor Information

Submissions can be made directly through the  “Submit Article” link on MFF’s homepage in word or rtf format. Please do not submit pdfs. Submissions may also be made as e-mail attachments to members of the Editorial Board or the Managing Editor. Submissions should be in 12 point Times Roman, double spaced throughout including quotations and  footnotes, and with margins a minimum of one inch all around in the order text, appendices, with illustrations and captions last.  Notes should be numbered consecutively. To facilitate blind review, do not include your name on the document. MFF follows the Chicago Manual of Style. Authors are responsible for obtaining any necessary permissions for the use of illustrations. Submissions may be made at any time.

Medieval Feminist Forum publishes solicited reviews of current scholarly books that address issues of feminism(s) and gender studies in relation to any of the disciplines of Medieval Studies. Reviews (1,000-1,200 words, single monographs; 1,500-1,600, two monographs) should be submitted in electronic format and follow the specified submission style guidelines. Reviewers should be faculty or qualified independent scholars , but advisors, mentors, or faculty members of SMFS may also suggest graduate students as reviewers of specific works that, in their judgment, the student is qualified to review. SMFS members have priority as reviewers. Qualified persons interested in reviewing books should contact the Book Review Editor, Helene Scheck, Department of English, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12222, hscheck@albany.edu.

Publishers or authors interested in having a monograph reviewed in MFF should send a copy to: Helene Scheck, Department of English, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12222, hscheck@albany.edu. Books submitted are not returned, and become the property of MFF.

Further information concerning Medieval Feminist Forum can be found at http://ir.uiowa.edu/mff/policies.html

For any questions, please contact the Managing Editor, Chris Africa, chris-africa@uiowa.edu.

Subsidia Series

The Subsidia series was created to provide a forum for scholarship on focused topics too substantial for an article and too short for a full-sized book. In the online environment, the Subsidia series will, instead, be an outlet for open-access resources for scholarship and teaching on women and gender in medieval studies.

The original Subsidia series includes two volumes.

Volume 1: Medieval Women in Film, edited by Charlene Miller-Avrich and Virginia Blanton-Whetsell. (2000). OUT of PRINT.

Virginia Blanton, Martha M. Johnson-Olin, and Charlene Miller Avrich, Medieval Women in Film: An Annotated Handlist and Reference Guide, with Essays on Teaching The Sorceress, 2nd edition (2014).

Includes:

    • Annotated lists of films, film databases, and movie guides
    • Pedagogical approaches to teaching with film
    • Annotated webliography
    • Essays on teaching The Sorceress
      1. Teaching The Sorceress (Fiona Harris Stoertz)
      2. The Sorceress and The Greyhound (Constance Brittain Bouchard)
      3. Under the Spell of the Sorceress: The Allure of the Medieval (Mary A. Suydam)
      4. The Sorceress as an Interpretive Tool in Medieval History Classes (Lisa M. Bitel)
      5. Film, Women and History (Jacqueline Jenkins)
      6. Water Down the Ventriloquist’s Throat: Testing the Voice of the Middle Ages on Film (Magarett Jewett)

Volume 2: Women in Medieval Iberia: A Selected Bibliography, edited by Rafael M. Mérida- Jiménez, with an introduction by Barbara F. Weissberger. (2002)

SMFS welcomes proposals from its members to edit individual Subsidia issues. If you would like to propose a Subsidia volume aside from proposals for Texts in Translation, please send your proposal electronically to the Managing Editor, chris-africa@uiowa.edu.

Medieval Texts in Translation Series

Part of the Subsidia series of Medieval Feminist Forum, the Medieval Texts in Translation series provides high quality, peer-reviewed, open-access editions and translations of medieval texts produced by, for, or about women. These texts tend to be too short to warrant a full-length hard copy edition; they have not been translated into Modern English since the early twentieth century (if at all). Medieval Texts in Translation are accessible and useful to a non-specialist audience even as they provide important resources for scholars in all disciplines. Proposals and inquiries for Texts in Translation should be addressed to the series editor Mary Dockray-Miller (mdockray@lesley.edu).

The series editor is responsible for soliciting, fielding, and vetting proposals for the series; finding appropriate peer-reviewers for the proposed texts; and working with authors/editors/translators to produce final work that is accessible to non-specialist audiences even as it meets the highest scholarly standards.

Authors/editors/translators should follow the most recent Chicago Manual of Style, using the Notes and Bibliography (not Author-Date) citation format.

Editors should follow the guidelines for editing developed by the University of Toronto:
http://medieval.utoronto.ca/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/editionsguide.pdf.

The initial title in the Texts in Translation series is The Liturgical Dramas for Holy Week at Barking Abbey, introduced, edited, and translated by Anne Bagnall Yardley and Jesse D. Mann (2014).